The most common style purchased in America is undoubtedly the American adjunct lager. In brewing terms, any fermentable sugar not from malted barley is considered an adjunct, and to brew this style, a tremendous amount of corn and rice is used to lighten the body, provide fermentable sugars, and most importantly, cut costs. This style is the main style brewed by large scale (macro) breweries to appeal to the masses. Easy to approach and lacking depth of flavor, this is the style to drink in quantity and not meant for savoring (despite what advertisements lead you to believe).

Of all the styles produced by microbreweries, defined by the American Homebrewers Association as producing less than 700,000,000 L annually, lagers are the least represented. Despite the relative lack of expressive yeast flavors and rich malt flavor, lagers are some of the hardest and most costly styles to brew well. Since lagers are typically light and crisp, any off flavors show up readily and can not be covered up, unlike strong ales. Additionally, they require refrigeration and cold storage, which slows a brewery’s output due to the fermentation tank being occupied. With that being said, when a microbrewery begins producing lager beer in quantity, it’s safe to assume that brewery is yielding profits. Click to explore our selection…

 

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